• Home
  • Blog
  • If You Don’t Vote, You Can’t Complain

If You Don’t Vote, You Can’t Complain

Monday, March 09, 2020 6:24 PM | Texas Energy Advocates Coalition (TEAC) (Administrator)

The voter demographic in the United States is changing. This year one out of every ten eligible voters belongs to Generation Z. For those of you, like myself, who have trouble keeping up with the rise and fall of generations, Gen Z covers people between the ages of 18-23. This is also the age group the least likely to get out and vote. 

Another growing demographic is immigrants. This year they are making up another one in ten of eligible voters, but their populations are not evenly spread around the country. Just five states are home to 61% of immigrant voters. Those states order of the most to least immigrant voters are: California, New York, Florida, Texas and New Jersey. Pew Research also projects that this year Hispanic voters will be the largest racial or ethnic minority group in the electorate, making up just over 13%. But that does not necessarily mean more of them will be voting. Pew Research reports:

Voter turnout will play an important role in determining the relative electoral influence of different racial and ethnic groups. For example, while Hispanics will outnumber blacks among eligible voters next year, they may not actually cast more ballots than blacks due to different turnout patterns. In recent presidential elections, blacks were substantially more likely than Hispanics to vote. Indeed, the number of Hispanic eligible voters who didn’t vote has exceeded the number of those who did vote in every presidential election since 1996.

As every year, voting is one of the most important responsibilities of a citizen, but it seems there is always more emphasis on voting during a presidential election year. Politicians running for office are throwing around much talk this year about climate, fossil fuels and immigration policies, but what are the topics the average citizen is really concerned about?

According to Gallop, there are five topics of the 16 they asked people about that came out as extremely important to voters: healthcare, national security, gun policy, education, and economy. The full chart is listed below:


Extremely important

Extremely important + Very important



%

%

Healthcare

35

81

Terrorism and national security

34

80

Gun policy

34

74

Education

33

83

The economy

30

84

Immigration

28

74

Climate change

26

55

Abortion

25

64

The distribution of income and wealth in the U.S.

25

58

The federal budget deficit

23

72

Taxes

23

69

Race relations

23

66

The nation's infrastructure

22

74

Foreign affairs

21

64

Trade with other nations

18

68

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights

11

38


Infrastructure came in 13th on the list. This is both a compliment and a disgrace to the energy industry. It is a compliment to the industry that they are doing such a good job at providing the people with what they need when they need it, that they are not at the forefront of people’s minds. But it is also a disgrace that more people don’t understand the importance of the fossil fuel industry and its infrastructure. If they did, it would be at least in the top five of the list. It is time to be an advocate for the industry now more than ever. Those who do not understand that everything they have and use everyday is thanks to the fossil fuel industry and the fracking method need to be made aware. Never assume others will vote the same way you would, so you don’t need to get out and vote. Obviously, if enough people do this, the cause you thought was a sure thing, will be lost. 

Get out there, and stand tall and proud of the industry. Fossil fuels make this country great. Spread the word, and vote.

CONTACTS

Email: Kym@shalemag.com

Address: 5150 Broadway  #493, San Antonio, TX, 78209


SHARE


Copyright © 2020 Shale Oil & Gas Business Magazine

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software